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The Weekly Wrap

Here’s a collection of things that caught my attention this week:

- Best blog name that I’ve seen in a long time: Bub.blicio.us, which covers the “social economy”. Given all the angst recently about the Web 2.0 sky falling, Bub.blicio.us is ironically del.icio.us.

- Strangest site: Sleeping in Airports, which is devoted to sleeping in airports for free when you’re short of cash. It’s a creation of Toronto travel agent Donna McSherry. See the PlanetEye blog for more.

- A new phrase to describe all those annoying invitations you to try new Facebook applications: spapp (short for “application spam”). Full credit to my friend, Tyler Hamilton.

- StumbleUpon-eBay: Love to Stumble but still very, very puzzled why eBay felt compelled to spend $75-million to acquire it. Can someone please explain it to me given no one has put a good spin on it, including Mashable, which listed eight reasons why it happened.

- Leopard has barely been out a week, and there’s also rampant speculation about an update that will fix 24 bugs. Question: how can you have an army of people developing and testing a major, high-profile upgrade, and still have two dozen bugs emerge? As someone I knew said, “nothing’s perfect” but we’re talking about Apple.

- WordPress domo Matt Mullenweg does a keynote at BlogWorld yet no one asks himself about the speculation Automattic was the target of a $200-million takeover offer. (Thanks to Allen Stern and Tris Hussey for the great coverage)

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  • http://nomagichere.blogspot.com Marc Bernard

    Regarding the pending Leopard update, it’s no surprise there are bugs. All software has bugs. In the weeks and days leading up to a release like this, there will be bugs found. The decision must be made whether the bugs are serious enough to fix (and delay the product release) or if the product can ship as-is. There is always risk in fixing a bug, so it may be a better idea to release the product with a handful of known bugs, and quickly get an update out the door. That’s just how the software world works.